The 7 Best Places to See the World's Iconic Rivers

Have you ever been to a place where turbulent waters rush through a gorge so deep you’d have to climb 6,000 feet skyward to reach the top of the surrounding cliffs? The Tiger Leaping Gorge is only one of many locations where travelers journey to see the most iconic rivers in the world. Have you been to any of these spots?

Yangtze River
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River:
Yangtze
Where to see it: Tiger Leaping Gorge, China
Situated on a primary tributary of the upper Yangtze River is Tiger Leaping Gorge. One of the deepest river canyons in the world, this nearly 10-mile gorge has been drawing thousands of visitors to its rushing waters since opening to international tourists in the early 1990s. Its name is derived from an ancient legend around the tale of a tiger that was trying to escape a hunter, so it jumped across the river at the narrowest point.

Sailboat [Nile River]
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River:
Nile
Where to see it: Aswan, Egypt
Regarded as the longest river in the world, the winding Nile flows north through 11 countries and empties into the Mediterranean Sea. On its way, it passes through Aswan, an ancient city in southern Egypt. Centuries-old stone quarries are still evident in the native rock along the Nile, where Egyptians once created granite rock statues and obelisks that decorate the country to this day.

Rhine River
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River:
Rhine
Where to see it: Bacharach, Germany
Sitting on the Rhine’s edge in western Germany is the quaint German town of Bacharach.  Here, travelers have a chance to see the Wernerkapelle – an unfinished gothic ruin – and the 12th-century Stahleck Castle that towers over the picturesque, timber-frame houses lining the river.

Stone Arch Bridge over Mississippi River [Minneapolis, Minnesota]River: Mississippi
Where to see it:  Stone Arch Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Crossing diagonally over the Mighty Mississippi in Minneapolis is the Stone Arch Bridge. The Minnesota landmark serves as a walking and biking path that connects the Saint Anthony Falls Historic District to downtown Minneapolis. The bridge was built in 1883 and was originally used as a railroad bridge for James J. Hill’s Great Northern Railway.  

River [Ganges]
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River:
Ganges
Where to see it: Varanasi, India
Seen by Hindus as the most sacred river in the world, the Ganges makes its journey south from the western Himalayas and then east toward the Bay of Bengal where it flows into the Indian Ocean. The holy city of Varanasi sits on the banks of the Ganges in northern India’s Uttar Pradesh state.  The city is considered “the spiritual capital of India.”

The Amazon River [Brazil]
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River:
Amazon
Where to see it: Manaus, Brazil
Coming in second to the Nile River in length is the Amazon. This massive river can swell up to 30 miles wide during the wet seasons and opens up to an approximately 150-mile estuary at the river’s mouth. The Brazilian city of Manaus is located on the banks of the river, where the pink Amazon river dolphin thrives. Tourists seeking the best experiences on the snaking Amazon board boats in Manaus to ride the river.

River Danube [Vienna, Austria]
Shutterstock
River:
Danube
Were to see it: Vienna, Austria
Central Europe’s Danube is considered an international waterway. It flows southeast from the Black Forest for more than 1,700 miles until reaching the Danube Delta. Before emptying into the Black Sea, the Danube cuts through Vienna, Austria. Travelers can take the high-speed elevators more than 800 feet up in the air in the Danube Tower to capture jaw-dropping panoramic views of the river and the surrounding city.

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Lauren Elizondo

Autumn foliage, architectural decay, that feeling you get in your stomach when you speed over a dip in the road – these are just a few of Lauren Elizondo’s favorite things she’s had the chance to experience while traveling. When Lauren’s not writing abo