Here’s the No. 1 Place to Begin Your Four Corners Adventure

What will you love about Farmington, N.M.? Here’s a hint: It involves adventure, beauty and wide open spaces. Farmington is the ultimate destination – comprised of scenic landscapes photographers dream of, national parks and inspiring UNESCO World Heritage sites and the Four Corners region rich with Native American history. This is the heart of the American Southwest, and the start of an epic journey.

Take the first step toward an unforgettable vacation. Sign up for the Farmington, N.M. eNewsletter to learn more about what you can do on your Four Corners vacation, including information about:

Four Corners Loop | Farmington sits in the center of an exciting circle. Loop your way around it starting in Durango, Colo., just 45 miles north where you’ll spend the day browsing boutiques and souvenir shops. Pass through nearby Cortez to see artisans work at the Mesa Verde Pottery Gallery Southwest. Follow the path to the Four Corners Monument, placing you in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado all at once. Heading back to Farmington, the scenic Navajo Reservation will treat you to views of Shiprock Pinnacle, Chimney Rock and Sleeping Ute Mountain. 

Aztec Ruins National Monument | The ancient Puebloans, or Anasazi, have left remnants of their lives and culture with these Aztec ruins. Built in the 1100s, the weathered structures of the Anasazi heritage remain. Walk the self-guided trail through the rooms, leading to the Great Kiva at the end of the path. This 40-foot diameter semi-subterranean structure was a central religious site and the oldest and largest reconstructed kiva in North America. 

B-Square Ranch | Wildlife roam freely on this 12,000-acre ranch, which you can explore at no cost. Some 100,000 waterfowl call it home alongside deer, pheasant, quail, hawks, eagles, cattle, owls and more. Within the grounds, you can find one of the largest private collections of mounted animals in the world at the Bolack Museum of Fish and Wildlife. The collection takes you around the world, giving you a chance to view the beauty of the animal kingdom with more than 2,500 specimens from five continents. Switching from Mother Nature’s creatures to manmade machines, the Bolack Electromechanical Museum offers an entirely different collection complete with U.S. innovations. Elvis’ Cadillac, a train, printing press, computers and more are on display.

UNESCO World Heritage Sites | Chaco Culture National Historical Park, Taos Pueblo and Carlsbad Caverns National Park makes New Mexico the state with the most UNESCO World Heritage sites. To qualify as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a place must be of cultural or physical significance. To have three of them makes New Mexico pretty special. 

The Bisti Badlands | These well-weathered geological formations have only gotten finer with age. The 60 square miles of remote wilderness is steeped with colorful hoodoos, carved cliffs and delicately balancing boulders. Hike the five miles around the area at sunrise or sunset for the most stunning view. 

Mesa Verde National Park | The original inhabitants disappeared 700 years ago, but their concentration of cliffside dwellings remain. As the last known home of the Ancestral Puebloan civilization, Mesa Verde preserves their cultural relics. Atop its perch high on a plateau, you can walk through the Spruce Tree House and learn more at the Chapin Mesa Museum.  

Indian Country | Seven days will take you throughout Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Taos, Chama, Farmington, Gallup and Grants for an itinerary that focuses on the Native American history of the region. The Indian Country Circle Tour destinations spire out from its hub, Farmington, making that central local the perfect headquarters to come back to each night. 

The Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau is here to help plan your Four Corners vacation. Sign up for the Farmingtion eNewsletter to learn more.

Sponsored content provided by Farmington, New Mexico.


Facebook Twitter Pinterest Google
ad
Photo Gallery
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Photo
Previous Next
ad
Join Us On Twitter